Egg donation

No waiting list for donor eggs via the London Egg Bank 

Egg donation and egg-sharing

Egg donation

Egg donation

This process is most commonly used when the patient is unable to produce her own eggs. This type of infertility is often associated with older maternal age, when the ovary's store of follicles is beginning to run out. The tell-tale signs are irregular - and even absent - periods, which are often a prelude to the menopause. In normally 'fertile' women this can happen in their late 30s and early 40s, but there are also unfortunate younger women who are found to have a 'premature' menopause. This can happen in women as young as 20 or 30.

Some patients particularly the younger ones with premature menopause, consider donor eggs from a friend or family member.  This type of 'known donation' can be quite reassuring for the patient, who is secure in her knowledge of the donor's identity. However, such 'intrafamilial' donation can raise ethical questions and counselling is always essential.

The London Egg Bank provides high quality donor eggs without a wait for patients at the London Women's Clinic with a success rate of around 60%.  

Visit the London Egg Bank catalogue to view the donors available www.londoneggbankdonors.com

The London Egg Bank

The London Egg Bank was opened in 2013 by the team behind the London Women’s Clinic and London Sperm Bank to encourage egg donation in the UK. 

Despite our success with egg sharing and the opportunities for egg donation from overseas schemes, demand for donor eggs in the UK still outstrips supply. The London Egg Bank aims to increase the number of women coming forward as egg donors. A greater number of domestic egg donors will reduce the need for UK patients to go overseas for treatment.

The London Egg Bank provides high quality donor eggs without a wait for patients at the London Women's Clinic.  Our current success rate is around 60%.  

Visit the London Egg ank online catalogue: www.londoneggbankdonors.com

Egg-sharing

Egg-sharing, a treatment pioneered by consultants at the London Women's Clinic, allows a fertile woman to share half her eggs with another patient in return for free or subsidised IVF treatment, while the recipient has the eggs she otherwise cannot produce. 

The sharer has conventional IVF treatment, involving ovarian stimulation, egg collection and embryo transfer. But half the eggs collected are randomly allocated to the recipient, whose uterus is prepared for embryo transfer with hormone therapy. The recipient's allocated eggs are fertilised with her partner's or donor sperm and transferred as in conventional IVF. Good results have been reported for both sharers and recipients, suggesting that the one does neither better or worse than the other.

Anonymity of egg donors

Most donor eggs are provided anonymously, and treatments are subject to the regulations of the HFEA. This means that children born from donor sperm, embryos or eggs have at the age of 18 the right to know the identity of the donor. Some have argued that this removal of anonymity, which took place in 2005, is one reason why Britain's supply of donor eggs has shrunk in recent years.

Known egg donation

Some patients, particularly the younger ones with premature menopause, consider egg donation from a friend or family member.  This type of 'known donation' can be quite reassuring for the patient, who is secure in the knowledge of the donor's identity.  The known egg donor must fit a number of criteria before they can be accepted:

  • Be between the ages of 18 and 35
  • Be a non-smoker
  • Fit and healthy with a BMI between 20-30
  • Her FSH level on day 2/3 of the cycle must be less than 8 iu/L, Oestradiol and LH must all be normal
  • Have no previous history of severe endometriosis or of having had one ovary removed
  • Have no history of transmissible disease
  • No personal or family history of inheritable disorders
  • An egg provider will not be accepted with untreated polycystic ovarian disease

A number of blood tests will also need to be completed before treatment can take place. 

'Intrafamilial' donation can raise ethical difficulties and counselling is always essential.

Egg donation and egg-sharing

Egg donation

Egg donation

This process is most commonly used when the patient is unable to produce her own eggs. This type of infertility is often associated with older maternal age, when the ovary's store of follicles is beginning to run out. The tell-tale signs are irregular - and even absent - periods, which are often a prelude to the menopause. In normally 'fertile' women this can happen in their late 30s and early 40s, but there are also unfortunate younger women who are found to have a 'premature' menopause. This can happen in women as young as 20 or 30.

Some patients particularly the younger ones with premature menopause, consider donor eggs from a friend or family member.  This type of 'known donation' can be quite reassuring for the patient, who is secure in her knowledge of the donor's identity. However, such 'intrafamilial' donation can raise ethical questions and counselling is always essential.

The London Egg Bank provides high quality donor eggs without a wait for patients at the London Women's Clinic with a success rate of around 60%.  

Visit the London Egg Bank catalogue to view the donors available www.londoneggbankdonors.com

The London Egg Bank

The London Egg Bank was opened in 2013 by the team behind the London Women’s Clinic and London Sperm Bank to encourage egg donation in the UK. 

Despite our success with egg sharing and the opportunities for egg donation from overseas schemes, demand for donor eggs in the UK still outstrips supply. The London Egg Bank aims to increase the number of women coming forward as egg donors. A greater number of domestic egg donors will reduce the need for UK patients to go overseas for treatment.

The London Egg Bank provides high quality donor eggs without a wait for patients at the London Women's Clinic.  Our current success rate is around 60%.  

Visit the London Egg ank online catalogue: www.londoneggbankdonors.com

Egg-sharing

Egg-sharing, a treatment pioneered by consultants at the London Women's Clinic, allows a fertile woman to share half her eggs with another patient in return for free or subsidised IVF treatment, while the recipient has the eggs she otherwise cannot produce. 

The sharer has conventional IVF treatment, involving ovarian stimulation, egg collection and embryo transfer. But half the eggs collected are randomly allocated to the recipient, whose uterus is prepared for embryo transfer with hormone therapy. The recipient's allocated eggs are fertilised with her partner's or donor sperm and transferred as in conventional IVF. Good results have been reported for both sharers and recipients, suggesting that the one does neither better or worse than the other.

Anonymity of egg donors

Most donor eggs are provided anonymously, and treatments are subject to the regulations of the HFEA. This means that children born from donor sperm, embryos or eggs have at the age of 18 the right to know the identity of the donor. Some have argued that this removal of anonymity, which took place in 2005, is one reason why Britain's supply of donor eggs has shrunk in recent years.

Known egg donation

Some patients, particularly the younger ones with premature menopause, consider egg donation from a friend or family member.  This type of 'known donation' can be quite reassuring for the patient, who is secure in the knowledge of the donor's identity.  The known egg donor must fit a number of criteria before they can be accepted:

  • Be between the ages of 18 and 35
  • Be a non-smoker
  • Fit and healthy with a BMI between 20-30
  • Her FSH level on day 2/3 of the cycle must be less than 8 iu/L, Oestradiol and LH must all be normal
  • Have no previous history of severe endometriosis or of having had one ovary removed
  • Have no history of transmissible disease
  • No personal or family history of inheritable disorders
  • An egg provider will not be accepted with untreated polycystic ovarian disease

A number of blood tests will also need to be completed before treatment can take place. 

'Intrafamilial' donation can raise ethical difficulties and counselling is always essential.

Downloads

Egg donation information sheet

 

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