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A new clinic for patients who have suffered multiple failed cycles

Having a failed treatment cycle is always a disappointment and can be particularly frustrating when you have good quality embryos.  Our new implantation clinic aims to improve success rates for patients who have had failed treatment despite the transfer of good embryos by assessing the womb lining (endometrium).

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Having a failed treatment cycle is always a disappointment and can be particularly frustrating when you have good quality embryos.  Our new implantation clinic aims to improve success rates for patients who have had failed treatment despite the transfer of good embryos by assessing the womb lining (endometrium).

The clinic has been set up by the LWC’s Medical Director Professor Nick Macklon who has researched and published on this topic for the last twenty years and is recognised as a leading international authority on endometrial receptivity. He said about the clinic that “Until now treatments have been tried ‘blindly’ without a diagnosis of what may be wrong with the endometrium. The clinic aims to improve success rates by using a range of tests to assess uterine receptivity and subsequently creating a personalised treatment plan for each patient based on the results.” 

The clinic is available for women and couples who have experienced a lack of pregnancy despite the transfer of 3 or 4 good quality embryos at day 5 (blastocyst) transfer. The first step is to arrange a consultation with one of our dedicated specialists.  This can either be via a referral from your current consultant at the LWC or a self-referral to the clinic via our enquiries team in which your eligibility for the clinic can be discussed.

Testing will include a combination of hormonal blood tests, pelvic ultrasound scans and an endometrial biopsy.  An endometrial biopsy is similar to a smear test and involves retrieving a sample of tissue from the womb lining. This sample will then be sent to different laboratories to identify a possible cause for implantation failure and to determine which treatment might be most appropriate. 

Further treatment may mean changing the timing of your embryo transfer or giving you additional medication.  In some cases, it may also show that no changes need to be made.  Results from Professor Macklon’s implantation clinic in Copenhagen have achieved a pregnancy rate of around 40%. For more information about the implantation clinic and to discuss your eligibility to take part, please either talk to your current fertility specialist or contact our enquiries department on 020 7563 4309.

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